Oldest Cake In The U.S?

We could call this mummified wonder ‘Old Spice’ — at 100 years of age, the cake qualifies. And there’s definitely a hint of spice emanating from its layers. The surprise — after the age — may be that it’s a spice cake, not a fruit cake. At least that’s what Pierre Girard, of Golden Valley, thinks, based on its faint fragrance. His friends found the cake in 1992 on a closet shelf in St. Louis Park. They were doing an estate sale assessment, prompted by the death of an elderly resident, originally from Canada, who had died without heirs. The friends passed it along to him as a gag gift, never expecting that he would hang on to it. The cake was packed within a six-sided florist box with the handwritten inscription, “XMAS CAKE BAKED IN DEC. 1911″ on the lid. On the bottom of the box, there was more handwritten inscription: “Xmas Cake Baked in Year 1911 by my Mother’s Brother Alex died Dec. 27. Was operated on Xmas Day.” Last weekend, Girard celebrated the cake’s 100th birthday with friends and family, who snapped photos and peered at the curious confection atop his piano.” w/ photo + video

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Portable Gamecube

What’s really cool about the Envision is how truly portable it is. Unlike most Gamecube ‘handheld’ mods, this one skips the bulky optical drive, and requires that games be copied off to an SD card, but that’s what really helps it slim down. It’s capable of running every Gamecube game out there, except for Luigi’s Mansion, which apparently still needs some hacking to make that happen. It can also play all SNES and NES titles, as well as some N64 titles, so it’s a real dream system for Nintendo fans. The Envision was created by Jonathan Shine, and is compact enough to carry around without any problem.” w/ photos + video

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Lazy Jedi

“Master Dave just doesn’t feel motivated today. With great power eventually comes great laziness.” — Warialasky

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Hole Pocket

“Best puppeteering with a pair of pants I have ever seen.” — john52143

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Silent Snail Assassin

“Cone snails might not seem like deadly predators, especially when you consider how easily a fish could outswim them. However, these snails await the cover of darkness to prey on sleeping fish. They appear to release paralyzing chemicals before using a venomous barb to finally put the fish out of its misery.”

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Top 11 Best Slow Mo Kills

“Slow motion can make a good scene great, a bland scene interesting and a lackluster fight epic. Take a look at some of the best slow mo kills ever. Austrian priest and physicist August Musger invented the concept of slow motion in 1904. He didn’t realize that it would soon become one of the movie industry’s most important tools. Slowing down the speed of the film to let the viewer take in every detail can add a ton of drama and excitement to a shot. Especially a killing shot. Dive through film history to share the best slow mo kills of all time.” w/ videos

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