Lab-Grown Cheese

lab-grown-cheese

“The team first studied animal genomes to isolate the gene sequences responsible for producing milk protein or casein. After optimizing the genes to work within yeast, they synthesized the gene from scratch in a genetic compiler, base pair by base pair. There’s no need to touch a cow in the making of the cheese. These synthetic milk genes are inserted into yeast cells which begin manufacturing caseins. After the cells have been left to do their thing for awhile, the scientists separate yeast from caseins, add sugar, water, and vegetable oil. They now have real (synthetically derived) milk and can make any cheese using traditional techniques.” w/ photos + videos

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Tree Produces 40 Different Types Of Fruit

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Aken’s Tree of 40 Fruit looks like a normal tree for most of the year, but in spring it reveals a stunning patchwork of pink, white, red and purple blossoms, which turn into an array of plums, peaches, apricots, nectarines, cherries and almonds during the summer months, all of which are rare and unique varieties. Not only is it a beautiful specimen, but it’s also helping to preserve the diversity of the world’s stone fruit. Stone fruits are selected for commercial growing based first and foremost on how long they keep, then how large they grow, then how they look, and lastly how they taste. This means that there are thousands of stone fruit varieties in the world, but only a very select few are considered commercially viable, even if they aren’t the best tasting, or most nutritious ones.” w/ photos

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MIT Students Make 3D-Printed Ice Cream

3d-printed-ic

If your ice cream could look like anything in the world, what would you choose? A new machine could 3D print your ice cream in 15 minutes. Three students from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have hacked together a 3D printer that can produce edible Mr Whippy-style ice cream in any shape. Kyle Hounsell, Kristine Bunker and David Donghyun Kim developed the contraption – a modified version of an existing 3D printer connected to a “soft serve” ice-cream machine – as part of a graduate project in MIT’s additive manufacturing department.” w/ photos

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Next Trendy Grain Is Fonio

grain-is-fonio

According to National Geographic, the edible seeds of some of these crops could be the ‘next quinoa’. Fonio for example, Africa’s oldest cereal, is rich in amino acids and is said to be the most nutritious of all Earth’s grains. Its low sugar content also makes it ideal for people with diabetes. It has gone fairly unnoticed until now, though, but that could be set to change as superfoodies seek ways to get more of a nutritious fix… Fonio is itself also rich in protein and drought-resistant, making it an ideal crop for developing nations in West Africa struggling to cope with climate change.” w/ photos

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The Science Of BBQ

“Science is delicious. In this week’s video, I stop by the #1 BBQ joint in America (seriously, you can look it up) to learn about the science of BBQ!” — IOTBS

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Hi-Tech Veggie Burger

“The major issue with most veggie burgers? Texture. But there’s so much potential there – delicious beans or mushrooms all packed together into a puck and sandwiched between bread and condiments? That should be delicious, shouldn’t it? Your guests will go straight to town on these snappy burgers, free from the fear of any falling-food faux pas.” — ChefSteps

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Grasshopper Tacos

“It’s an ingredient not usually found on the menu, but one New York restaurant is serving up tacos with a twist – they’ll filled with grasshoppers. Authentic Mexican restaurant Toloache, on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, has been preparing the crunchy dish for loyal customers for a number of years. The insects are shipped dry from Mexico City, before being marinated, sautéed and then served in a tortilla with salsa verde. And while munching on the long-legged bugs might seem strange to western tastes, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) have promoted consumption of insects as a low-fat, high-protein weapon in the fight against hunger, global warming and pollution.” — Barcroft TV

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