World’s Oldest Bank Account

An Ohio woman who just turned 100 years old has taken customer loyalty to the extreme: She’s still using a bank savings account that’s been around almost as long as she has, since the year before World War I. June Gregg recently mentioned to a friend that her account is the same one her father opened for her in January 1913, when she wasn’t even a year-and-a-half old. The friend told the people at Gregg’s small-town bank in southern Ohio. “That perked my ears up, because I was like, ’1913?!’” said Doug Shoemaker, general manager of what’s now a Huntington National Bank branch in this community, 45 miles south of Columbus. The bank’s investigation found out that not only was it the same account, but also that the account number changed only once, when Columbus-based Huntington acquired the plainly-named Savings Bank in the early 1980s, Shoemaker said.” w/ photos

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World’s Oldest Female Bodybuilder

She may be a grandmother, but don’t call her old. Ernestine Shepherd, 74, of Baltimore has been crowned by the Guinness Book of World Records as the oldest competitive female bodybuilder ever. She told the Washington Post: ‘Age is nothing but a number’. Ms Shepherd has impeccably toned ‘six-pack’ abs that are the marvel of her Baltimore fitness centre. Her husband of 54 years, Collin Shepherd, says he ‘has trouble keeping guys away from her’. The Shepherds live in Baltimore with their son, 53, and grandson, 14. Ms Shepherd does some modelling and teaches fitness classes, and told the Washington Post, ‘If you are going to try to motivate people, you have to live that part’. She also trains rigorously with Yohnnie Shambourger, 57,a former Mr Universe who won the gold medal in bodybuilding at the Pan American Games in 1995. Mr Shambourger told the Post: ‘The six-pack is her signature. When she walks in a room and you see her six-pack, you say, “Ohh! Okay!” w/ photos

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Fast Underwater Swimmer

“Most of those swimmers would be able to do something similar but don’t because they get disqualified, commentator said looks like he’ll take the dq.” — mickd1337

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Ants’ Teamwork Skills

When you are building a new home sometimes you need some help. A little teamwork goes a long way and these green tree ants (or weaver ants) from Australia could teach us a thing or two about that. Their own task may, to begin with, seem almost impossible but with some supreme acrobatic skills anything, it seems, is possible. The ants climb on top of each other to form a kind of any pyramid or bridge to reach from one small twig or branch to another. This collaboration has to be seen to be believed. First they survey potential leaves by pulling at them with their mandibles… What is at the center of all this activity? Why, the queen of course, ready to bring the next generation in to the world once the nest is complete. This remarkable incidence of working together as a single team is not unique in the ant world, yet it must be said that most species do not possess the acrobatic prowess of the Australian green tree ant.” w/ photos

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Baby Kangaroo Brought Back To Life

A baby kangaroo was brought back from the dead after being given the kiss of life by a wildlife carer. So young that it hadn’t even grown hair yet, the joey – the name given to baby kangaroos – was rushed to a rescue center after it was found lying lifeless by the side of a road near Melbourne, Australia. The tiny pink animal was cold to the touch, but Lisa Milligan didn’t give up hope. She breathed air down its nose and mouth and massaged its heart until it suddenly came to. ‘It was gone for all love and money. It wasn’t breathing. It was icy to touch and rigid,’ Ms Milligan told Australia’s Herald Sun newspaper. ‘But I kept going and after 15 minutes, it suddenly barked, which is what they do. And it started turning from a lifeless grey color to perfect pink again.” w/ photos

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World’s Biggest Saw

The world’s biggest saw helps workers in Kazakhstan plough through hillsides by digging out 4,500 tonnes of coal an hour. Towering in at just over 145 feet and weighing a staggering 45,000 tons, the massive machine obliterates anything in its path. The saw has jagged buckets attached to the rotating blade – which works in a similar fashion to a chain saw. The buckets dig deep into the coal seam and break off mammoth chunks – before it travels around a conveyor belt and straight into containers positioned on waiting trains. The mammoth excavator needs a total of 27 people to operate it at any one time. Slava Stepanov, who took the above photo, explained that whoever operating it from the armchair at its top is the envy of all workers.” w/ photo

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Farthest-Ever Explosion Found?

A group of researchers claim they’ve found the most distant explosion ever detected, a pulse of high energy radiation sent by a disintegrating star near the very edge of the observable universe. The stellar blast was first spotted by a NASA satellite in April 2009, but researchers announced that they have since gathered data placing it more than 13 billion light years away — meaning that the event took place when the universe was still in its infancy. Andrew Levan, one of the scientists behind the discovery, said this blast from the past blew open a window onto the universe’s early years, showing that massive stars were already dying within the first few hundred million years of the birth of the universe. This particular explosion wasn’t a supernova but a gamma ray burst, the name given to a short but powerful pulse of high energy radiation. Such bursts, thought to result from the collapse of massive stars into black holes, shoot jets of energy across the universe. Charles Meegan, a researcher in gamma ray astronomy, said that a typical burst “puts out in a few seconds the same energy expended the sun in its whole 10 billion year life span.” w/ photo

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